0 1 2 3 4
 
Catalog No: FLX67
Title: Theatermusik
Sound Artist: Frank Rothkamm
Visual Artist: Holger Rothkamm
Label: Flux Records
Length: 38:14 (2294s)
Composed: 1982-1985
Location: Moers
Instruments: Clarinet
UHER Royal Deluxe
Viola
Piano
Voice
Tuba
Violin
Violoncello
Flute
Release Date: 10/3/2016
Format: Digital
File Under: theater soundtrack


Frank Rothkamm [ Theatermusik ]
In the beginning, there was already everything there, perfectly formed, like an egg in its shell. I joined the theater when I was 15 and started acting and writing "Theatermusik", German for "theater music". But first I had my ears pierced, got earrings and a perm. My mother was all for it, she also got perms; the piercing was another story. With acne blossoming all over my face, I applied make-up creams to my face with less skill and success than the other girls in my class in school. See, for the last 3 years of "Gymnasium", that's what the Germans call high school for those destined to go to college, I was the only boy in all my classes. The school just switched to co-ed and, as girls are much smarter than boys, there were only 3 boys left, the others were left behind or switched to the all-boy "Gymnasium". So I tried to fit in as much as possible, but since it was the Eighties I also showed resistance and wore a lot of pin-back buttons, with "Atomkraft? Nein Danke", German for "Nuclear power? No thanks" and, of course, the Rollings Stones tongue. Society seemed dominated by ruthless males, music by male vocals, and I wanted no part in it. Instead, I got minor parts in plays and studied with Marcus Lachmann at the local avant-garde theater, like many others, and there I really liked the boys and adored the girls because they were sensitive and intellectual. We did quite a few plays, but it was the production of "Reproduktion Untersagt", German for "reproduction prohibited", that we developed on our own, that really stood out, as we performed it at the local "Jugendzentrum", German for "youth center". During the day the teenage wasteland youth had the run of the place and at night there we were, instead of the local punk band. So ambitious were we, that we thought post-modernism was it and accordingly I tried to develop a "feminist" post-modernism. Everything was based on something, but mostly I took score snippets from Anton Bruckner's 7th Symphony, which was Adolf Hitler's favorite, and applied mathematical operations to it, so the results were anti-Wagnerian: stretched out, spacey, introspective or even dissolved into speech.
[Theatermusik] Image